Star Trek Inspires NASA Scientists

The summer blockbuster Star Trek: Beyond has inspired the naming of NASA’s newest Hubble Telescope image.

jon round 1By  Jonathan Stroud
JournalistsForSpace.com

 

In honor of the newest Star Trek movie and the 50th-anniversary of the television series, NASA scientists have named the Hubble telescope’s most recent image “the frontier.” The shows iconic popular-culture references to exploring the “final frontier” reportedly inspired some NASA scientists to pursue their passions for space exploration.

When the television show first aired in 1966 telescopes were only able to observe half of the current observable Universe. According to NASA, “the rest was uncharted territory. But Hubble’s powerful vision has carried us into the true ‘final frontier.'”

hubble new image“The Frontier”  Credits: NASA, ESA, J. Lotz(STCI)

The funhouse mirror distortion effect in the image is warped space, an anomaly first predicted by Albert Einstein.

Check out this video of NASA explaining the Star Trek homage and spacewarp anomaly: : 
*Video Credit NASA

Star Trek: Beyond was released nationwide in theaters today July 22, 2016.


Are you going to watch the newest Star Trek movie? Pre-order on Blu-Ray Today!!

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Read the full NASA press release here.

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Author: Jonathan Stroud 

*Featured image: Paramount Pictures 

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