SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Destroyed

SpaceX Falcon 9 has exploded during a static test firing at Cape Canaveral.

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Credit: @krisn99

jon round 1By  Jonathan Stroud
JournalistsForSpace.com

During a routine static fire test the Falcon 9 rocket and  Spacecom Satellite Communications Ltd’s (TASE: SCC) have been destroyed as a result of an explosion while on the launch pad.

According to SpaceX, “There was an anomaly on the pad resulting in the loss of the vehicle and its payload.” The Amos-6, a 5.5-ton Earth communications satellite, was set to replace the Amos-2 spacecraft currently providing services to Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. SpaceX has confirmed no injuries occurred as a result of the explosion. The Israeli communications satellite was to be used by Facebook and Eutelsat for the Internet.org initiative, helping areas of the world gain cheap access to the Internet.

The Falcon 9 launch was scheduled for Saturday Sept. 3rd, and was to be the ninth this year for SpaceX. The company is currently slated for more launches before the end of the year; but, it in unforeseen at this time whether the incident will delay the SpaceX’s future launch schedules.

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CreditL NASA TV

SpaceX experienced a rocket explosion last year, June 2015, and the investigation grounded the company for six months.

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Credit: AP/Marcia Dunn

Make sure to keep up with the latest SpaceX updates and more Space related content at Journalists For Space.

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